Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://sgc.anlis.gob.ar/handle/123456789/2126
Title: Pilot Field Trial of the EG95 Vaccine Against Ovine Cystic Echinococcosis in Rio Negro, Argentina: Second Study of Impact
Authors: Larrieu, Edmundo 
Mujica, Guillermo 
Gauci, Charles G 
Vizcaychipi, Katherina A. 
Seleiman, Marcos 
Herrero, Eduardo 
Labanchi, Jose Luis 
Araya, Daniel 
Sepulveda, Luis 
Grizmado, Claudia 
Calabro, Arnoldo 
Talmon, Gabriel 
Poggio, Thelma Verónica 
Crowley, Pablo 
Céspedes, Graciela 
Santillan, Graciela 
García Cachau, Mariela 
Lamberti, Roberto 
Gino, Lilia 
Donadeu, Meritxell 
Lightowlers, Marshall W 
Keywords: Equinococosis;Vacunación;Diagnóstico;Control;Análisis Espacial
Issue Date: 30-Oct-2015
Journal: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 
Abstract: 
Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important zoonotic disease caused by the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus. It occurs in many parts of the world where pastoral activities predominate, including the Rio Negro province of Argentina. Although CE control activities have been undertaken in the western regions of Rio Negro for more than two decades, the disease continues to remain prevalent in both the human and livestock animal populations. Vaccination of animal intermediate hosts of CE with the EG95 vaccine may provide a new opportunity to improve the effectiveness of CE control measures, although data are lacking about field application of the vaccine. Aims Evaluate the impact of EG95 vaccination in sheep on the transmission of Echinococcus granulosus in a field environment. Methodology Two trial sites were established in western Rio Negro province within indigenous communities. Vaccination of lambs born into one trial site was introduced and continued for 6 years. Prior to initiation of the trial, and at the end of the trial, the prevalence of CE in sheep was determined by necropsy. Weaned lambs received two injections of EG95 vaccine, approximately one month apart, and a single booster injection one year later. Vaccination was not implemented at the second trial site. A total of 2725 animals were vaccinated in the first year. Animals from this cohort as well as age-matched sheep from the control area were evaluated by necropsy. Key results Introduction of the vaccine led to a statistically significant in the number and size of hydatid cysts in comparison to the situation prior to the introduction of the vaccine, or compared to CE prevalence in the control area where the vaccine was not applied. The prevalence of infection in the vaccinated area was also significantly reduced by 62% compared to the reintervention level, being lower than the prevalence seen in the control area, although the difference from the control area after the intervention was not significant possibly due to limitations in the numbers of animals available for necropsy. Conclusions Vaccination of sheep with the EG95 vaccine provides a valuable new tool which improves the effectiveness of CE control activities. Vaccination was effective even in a difficult, remote environment where only approximately half the lambs born into the communities were fully vaccinated.
Description: 
Fil: Larrieu, Edmundo. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias; Argentina.

Fil: Mujica, Guillermo. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Gauci, Charles G. University of Melbourne. Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences; Australia.

Fil: Vizcaychipi, Katherina. ANLIS Dr.C.G.Malbrán. Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas. Departamento de Parasitología; Argentina.

Fil: Seleiman, Marcos. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Herrero, Eduardo. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Labanchi, José Luis. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Araya, Daniel. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Sepúlveda, Luis. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Grizmado, Claudia. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Calabro, Arnoldo. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Talmon, Gabriel. Ministerio de Salud, Provincia de Río Negro; Argentina.

Fil: Poggio, Thelma Verónica. Cesar Milstein-CONICET/Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología.. Centro de Virología Animal (CEVAN); Argentina.

Fil: Crowley, Pablo. Universidad Nacional de Río Negro. Escuela de Veterinaria; Argentina.

Fil: Cespedes, Graciela. ANLIS Dr.C.G.Malbrán. Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas. Departamento de Parasitología; Argentina.

Fil: Santillán, Graciela. ANLIS Dr.C.G.Malbrán. Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas. Departamento de Parasitología; Argentina.

Fil: García Cachau, Mariela. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias; Argentina.

Fil: Lamberti, Roberto. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias; Argentina.

Fil: Gino, Lilia. Universidad Nacional de La Pampa. Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias; Argentina.

Fil: Donadeu, Meritxell. University of Melbourne. Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences; Australia.

Fil: Lightowlers, Marshall W. University of Melbourne. Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences; Australia.
URI: http://sgc.anlis.gob.ar/handle/123456789/2126
ISSN: 1935-2735
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004134
Rights: Open Access
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Appears in Collections:Publicaciones INEI

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