Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://sgc.anlis.gob.ar/handle/123456789/196
Title: Evolution of Multiresistance in Nontyphoid Salmonella Serovars from 1984 to 1998 in Argentina
Authors: Orman, Betina E. 
Piñeiro, Silvia A. 
Arduino, Sonia 
Galas, Marcelo F. 
Melano, Roberto 
Caffer, María Inés 
Sordelli, Daniel O. 
Centrón, Daniela 
Keywords: Salmonella;Evolución Molecular;Resistencia a Medicamentos;Argentina
Issue Date: 2002
Description: Molecular evolution of multiresistance in nontyphoid Salmonella spp. was investigated with 155 isolates obtained in Argentina from 1984 to 1998. In 74 isolates obtained from 1984 to 1988 resistance was associated with the presence of Tn3, Tn9, class I (In0) and II (Tn7) integrons, and the aac(3)-IIa gene. Extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC) resistance in Salmonella spp. emerged in 1989, and 81 isolates resistant to at least one ESC and one aminoglycoside were collected thereafter. Among these, two patterns of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms were found: from 1989 to 1992, resistance was related to the spreading of Tn1331 and blaCTX-M-2, in addition to the persistence of In0 and Tn7. From 1993 to 1998, several integrons were added to the first pattern and three integron groups (IG), namely, IG1 (38% of the isolates), IG2 (51%), and IG3 (11%), were identified. At least two -lactamase genes were detected in 65% of the isolates (after 1989) by PCR analysis. Furthermore, five -lactamase genes, blaCTX-M-2, blaOXA-9, blaOXA-2, blaTEM-1, and blaPER-2, were found in two isolates. The blaCTX-M-2 gene was found in several complex sulI-type integrons with different rearrays within the variable region of class I integrons, suggesting evolution of these integrons in nontyphoid Salmonella. In conclusion, progressive acquisition and accumulation of plasmid-mediated resistance determinants occurred from 1984 to 1998 in nontyphoid Salmonella isolates of the most prevalent serovars from Argentina. It is suggested that antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in these bacteria may have been the consequence of plasmid exchange between Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli or Shigella flexneri and/or spreading of mobile elements from the nosocomial environment.
Fil: Orman, Betina E. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Departamento de Microbiología; Argentina.
Fil: Piñeiro, Silvia A. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Departamento de Microbiología; Argentina.
Fil: Arduino, Sonia. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Departamento de Microbiología; Argentina.
Fil: Galas, Marcelo. ANLIS Dr.C.G.Malbrán. Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas; Argentina.
Fil: Melano, Roberto. ANLIS Dr.C.G.Malbrán. Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas; Argentina.
Fil: Caffer, María Inés. ANLIS Dr.C.G.Malbrán. Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Infecciosas; Argentina.
Fil: Sordelli, Daniel O. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Departamento de Microbiología; Argentina.
Fil: Centrón, Daniela. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Departamento de Microbiología; Argentina.
URI: http://aac.asm.org/content/46/12/3963.full.pdf+html
http://sgc.anlis.gob.ar/handle/123456789/196
ISSN: 1098-6596
Rights: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
Appears in Collections:Publicaciones INEI
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