Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://sgc.anlis.gov.ar/handle/123456789/1385
Title: Epidemiological and virological characteristics of influenza B: results of the Global Influenza B Study
Authors: Caini, Saverio 
Huang, Q Sue 
Ciblak, Meral A 
Kusznierz, Gabriela F. 
Owen, Rhonda 
Wangchuk, Sonam 
Henriques, Cláudio M P 
Njouom, Richard 
Fasce, Rodrigo A 
Yu, Hongjie 
Feng, Luzhao 
Zambon, Maria 
Clara, Alexey W 
Kosasih, Herman 
Puzelli, Simona 
Kadjo, Hervé A 
Emukule, Gideon O 
Heraud, Jean-Michel 
Ang, Li Wei 
Venter, Marietjie 
Mironenko, Alla 
Brammer, Lynnette 
Mai, Le Thi Quynh 
Schellevis, François 
Plotkin, Stanley 
Paget, John 
Keywords: Estudio Global de Influenza B (GIBS);Carga de enfermedad;Epidemiología;Gripe Humana;Vacunación;vaccine mismatch
Issue Date: Aug-2015
Journal: Influenza and other respiratory viruses 
Abstract: 
INTRODUCTION: Literature on influenza focuses on influenza A, despite influenza B having a large public health impact. The Global Influenza B Study aims to collect information on global epidemiology and burden of disease of influenza B since 2000.
METHODS: Twenty-six countries in the Southern (n = 5) and Northern (n = 7) hemispheres and intertropical belt (n = 14) provided virological and epidemiological data. We calculated the proportion of influenza cases due to type B and Victoria and Yamagata lineages in each country and season; tested the correlation between proportion of influenza B and maximum weekly influenza-like illness (ILI) rate during the same season; determined the frequency of vaccine mismatches; and described the age distribution of cases by virus type.
RESULTS: The database included 935 673 influenza cases (2000-2013). Overall median proportion of influenza B was 22·6%, with no statistically significant differences across seasons. During seasons where influenza B was dominant or co-circulated (>20% of total detections), Victoria and Yamagata lineages predominated during 64% and 36% of seasons, respectively, and a vaccine mismatch was observed in ≈25% of seasons. Proportion of influenza B was inversely correlated with maximum ILI rate in the same season in the Northern and (with borderline significance) Southern hemispheres. Patients infected with influenza B were usually younger (5-17 years) than patients infected with influenza A.
CONCLUSION: Influenza B is a common disease with some epidemiological differences from influenza A. This should be considered when optimizing control/prevention strategies in different regions and reducing the global burden of disease due to influenza.
URI: http://sgc.anlis.gob.ar/handle/123456789/1385
DOI: 10.1111/irv.12319
Appears in Collections:Publicaciones INER

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